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Archive for February, 2012

Feb 07

You never know what you’ll find there, so make sure to connect!

Feb 06

Like the rest of America, last night I too was watching the Super Bowl.  And probably like many more people than would publicly admit, I was really watching for the Half-Time Show and the commercials.  One that I found particularly interesting and cute, I’ve posted below: it gave me the opportunity to make a quick comparison to something that I made note of in my book, Piece of the Fame.  In a section entitled “Operate from a Platform,” I give the example of Coca-Cola’s recent Holiday campaign with the white cans and social media tie-in to saving the polar bear habitat.  It wasn’t a successful campaign, and my opinion on it was that it simply lacked a connection to something that we care about in our day to day lives.  Yes, they’re big, furry and conceptually friendly, but we don’t have the same attachment to polar bears as we do to people…or beer-fetching dogs.

Yes, the Coca-Cola website crashed yesterday because of traffic I’m assuming that was bolstered by the clever cartoons featuring the polar bear family.  But what I’m much more interested in is Bud Light’s social media numbers based on their masterful incorporation of Facebook into their “Rescue Dog” commercial.  If you didn’t see it, check it out – and then watch for the social media push at the end.  That’s a cause I can get behind.

If you haven’t had a chance, get your hands on a copy of my book Piece of the Fame: Rockstar Social Media Marketing for Everyone to Ignite Your Busines, Career and Personal Brand and join the conversation!

Feb 03

I read an article coming from Ad Age that confirmed the need for Piece of the Fame.  Even among large-footprint researchers, leading minds in the business of digital media and advertising don’t have all of their facts straight, and this article proved to be a prime example.  Half of it is correct and consistent with the metrics that I’ve seen across a number of Facebook Pages with which I’ve been involved, huge and not-so-huge: the truth is that if you include the initial “Like” only 1.5% of the Fans of a Page actually interact with that Page.  If you take the initial “Like” action out of the equation, that number drops precipitously to 0.45%.

And then the other half of the article was not correct and was inconsistent with the nature of Facebook.  A quote from the researcher that was included in this article, speaking on the engagement numbers:

“I don’t think it’s a bad thing,” said Karen Nelson-Field, senior research associate for Ehrenberg-Bass Institute who describes herself as a “Facebook advocate.” “People need to understand what it can do for a brand and what it can’t do. Facebook doesn’t really differ from mass media. It’s great to get decent reach, but to change the way people interact with a brand overnight is just unrealistic.”

I’m not going to make a comment on their data collection methods or the fact that they didn’t measure inbound traffic from links that may have been posted (they only used the “People Talking About This” feature to measure engagement), but what I will say is the conclusion above does not take into account Facebook’s use of EdgeRank, which is their algorithm that decides out of all the content posted on Facebook that your connected to, what you actually see in your Feed.  So, that means for a brand operating a Page on Facebook, essentially, if people don’t engage with your content on Facebook, they will never see your content.  It’s a bit of a vicious cycle. If you’re putting a ton of time and resources (in other words, $$$) into your Facebook marketing efforts, and you’re seeing results of under 0.5% engagement, that means that for all those Likes that you purchased at about $1.00 each on average, you’re getting essentially no return on your investment.  So, contrary to the above statement, a lack of engagement on Facebook is actually very bad because Facebook does differ from mass media, significantly.  An analogy would be, let’s say you watch CNN and every time a car commercial came on, you changed the channel.  Well, if CNN operated like Facebook, they would modify the commercials that you saw so that you specifically never saw another car commercial again, or any other commercial that made you change the channel.  Mass media is a one-size-fits-all model where all content, whether it be advertising or premium creative, is weighted equally and seen by the entire audience.  Facebook doesn’t do that.

I think that brands still have a long way to go in understanding what their efforts on Facebook mean in terms of real results.  Somebody paid that researcher above a lot of money for the conclusion that she reached…

To learn more about EdgeRank and what it means for brands on Facebook, pick up a copy of my book, Piece of the Fame: Rockstar Social Media Marketing Strategy for Everyone to Ignite Your Business, Career and Personal Brand on Amazon.  I tried to clear up a lot of this misunderstanding about what is actually going on with Facebook Likes, because it seems as if even the major research shops are still somewhat in the dark.  If you already have the book, discussion starts on Page 154.

Feb 02

Google+ LogoIn all honesty, I had a bit of  struggle deciding whether or not to include Google+ in Piece of the Fame.  The reality is that despite the blockbuster numbers recently quoted by Larry Page, of 90 Million registered accounts (just shy of Twitter’s numbers), my sense is that this platform is a far ways off from becoming a social media staple for a critical mass of people.  I consider myself in a social circle of early adopters of technology, and I have yet to feel any kind of pressure to move to Google+ for fear of “missing something” that has been posted or published.  Everything that I need to know or share is found within the realms of either Twitter or Facebook.  So, for all of Google’s scale, which I’m sure bolsters those Google+ numbers, the reality is that this is still a new social network that is struggling with the discovery of its identity and role.  It’s premature for brands to divert valuable time and resources to trying to figure out their place, as the personal users haven’t really shown up yet.  That said, I’ve been keeping my eye on this developing platform, a very very close and active eye on it.  I want it to do well.  As far as social networks go, I’m at a point where I want a new option and alternative that makes sense.

Further to this idea, I saw an interesting article on TechCrunch by Bindu Reddy that provides some insightful possible solutions to Google+’s adoption problem.  If you’re going to check it out, the best part is the comments section:  gives a great overview of how the industry is really responding to Google’s new social product.